This refers to a PREVIOUS SW, held February 6, 2016
Please see this page for the most recent Sound Waters information
Dr. Deborah Kelley

photo of Professor Kelley standing next to a towering marine robotDeborah S. Kelley is a Professor in the School of Oceanography at the University of Washington. She has been involved in numerous discoveries of seafloor hot springs that vent fluids of over 700°F  and which host some of the most novel life forms on Earth.

Her current research examines the linkages between submarine volcanoes and underwater hot springs, and how they support life in the absence of sunlight. In 2000, she was part of the team that discovered the Lost City Hydrothermal Field which contains 150,000 year-old carbonate chimneys that rise 180 feet above the surrounding seafloor. The chimneys host microbes that thrive in methane- and hydrogen-rich fluids with properties of liquid drano.

Professor Kelley has participated in over 35 blue-water cruises, leading many of them. She routinely uses robotic vehicles to study the seafloor and has been on over 50 Alvin deep-sea submersible dives to depths as great as 12,000 feet beneath the ocean surface.She is the UW Associate Director of Science for the Ocean Observatories Initiative Cabled Array that connects over 100 instruments offshore Oregon directly to the Internet.

Professor Kelley actively shares her passion of sea-going research with others, co-leading a program to teach K-12 students and teachers how to build instruments for marine and terrestrial environments. She is a coauthor of “Discovering the Deep, A Photographic Atlas of the Seafloor and Oceanic Crust," a new book from Cambridge Press which provides over 500 stunning images of the longest underwater mountain chain on Earth and the life that thrives within these extreme environments.

Links to my teaching and research pages include: http://www.ocean.washington.edu/home/Deborah+Kelley

You can connect to the underwater cabled observatory - bringing the Internet into the oceans: http://interactiveoceans.washington.edu/

And you can 'explore' the Lost City - one of the most extreme environments on Earth: www.lostcity.washington.edu/ http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/05lostcity/welcome.html

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